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Bea Covington, New KCD Executive Director

King Conservation District Executive Director

Please join us in welcoming Bea Covington as the new King Conservation District Executive Director. Dick Ryon, KCD Board Chair, wrote: "Ms. Covington brings extensive experience building community through strategic partnerships in challenging and fluid environments. From critical stabilization work in Afghanistan to expanding conservation practices in Missouri, Ms. Covington has achieved a broad palette of critical objectives through building coalitions and identifying common interests. Her commitment to making the world a better place and her immutable respect for those around her ultimately propelled her to the top of an impressive list of highly qualified candidates."
To learn more about KCD's new Executive Director, Click here.

KCD Initiates New Regional Food System Metrics Project

Regional Food System Metrics Project

In early July the KCD Board of Supervisors approved $125,000 in funding for the of KCD Regional Food System Program to establish a benchmark and tracking system to measure progress toward achieving goals of the King County Local Food Initiative. In collaboration with King County and partner organizations, the Food System Program Metrics Project will catalog available farm-related food system data, develop a data mapping portal, support a local food system metrics dashboard, identify data gaps, and support baseline data collection to fill key data gaps. The Metrics Project is one of a series of KCD initiatives that contribute to the economic viability of local farmers, encourage more new farmers, expand acreage in food production, improve food access, and increase demand for local farm products. See our website to learn more about the KCD Regional Food System Program.

urban forest health management picture

New Program Helps Restore Urban Forests

King Conservation District initiated a new Urban Forest Health Management Program in 2015 to assist local communities with stewarding street trees, urban backyards, and forested open spaces. Cities participating in the program's first year include Bothell, Lake Forest Park, Medina, and Shoreline, plus four cities participating in the King County-Cities Climate Collaboration: Burien, Normandy Park Sammamish, and Snoqualmie. See our website to learn more about the program:

Veterans Give Back

KCD Washington Conservation Corps Crews Featured on KING-5 News

The King Conservation District currently employs two Washington Conservation Corps crews with a total of 12 young people assisting with resource conservation projects across the county. Environmental reporter Alison Morrow highlighted the assistance WCC crewmembers provide private landowners in a KING-5 newscast.

Learn About Native Pollinators

King Conservation District Annual Meeting Report

KCD LIFT Program

The Local Institutional Food Team (LIFT) is here to help you source local food for your institution! We are a network of resource providers and industry experts that provide technical assistance to purchasers looking for local farm products and those wanting to start or participate in existing projects and programs that support local agriculture.
More Information

King Conservation District Annual Meeting Report

Poultry Processing Equipment

King Conservation District provides low-cost rental of equipment for small-scale producers to safely process poultry for home consumption, or to slaughter poultry for direct marketing with a WSDA permit. At this time no other poultry processing equipment is available for rent in King County. The KCD project helps producers fill the demand for locally-grown chicken, turkey, and other poultry.
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KCD Volunteers

Infrastructure Mapping Tool

In collaboration with King County and the Cascade Harvest Coalition, the King Conservation District has developed an easy-to-use online tool that farmers, cottage industry business owners, facility owners, and policy makers can access to expand opportunities for local food production in King County.
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KCD Volunteers


In 2015, a total of 772 volunteers contributed 2,872 service hours on KCD sponsored habitat restoration projects totaling $66,515.52 (based on Washington state compensation rate for matching purposes).  Connect with your community and local environment to discover how you can be a better steward of the natural resources around you.  Discover volunteer opportunities at

King Conservation District Annual Meeting Report

The deadline for the 2016 Regional Food System Grant round closed on Thursday, April 14th.  KCD received 33 pre-proposals covering a wide diversity of food system topics.  Requested grant funding totals just over $2.5 million.

Expanded outreach resulted in a greater diversity of community organizations, non-profits, farms, and others participating in this year’s grant round.  The potential for these projects to have a positive impact on our regional food system is fantastic!  Projects range from farmer education and farm incubators, to value-added processing, infrastructure improvements, marketing support for local food, healthy food access, institutional purchasing, food hub development in both urban and rural areas, and so much more.

For more information click Here.

New Video Highlights Agricultural Drainage Program


At the KCD annual meeting King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert presented the premier screening of a new video about the about the Agricultural Drainage Program. Funded with support from the King County Flood Control District, the program enables participating farmers to return improve field drainage and return land to full production.

KCD Introduces New Urban Forest Program

The King Conservation District’s new Urban Forest Health Management Program will invest up to $150,000 annually for the next five years to help communities steward street trees, urban backyards, and forested open spaces. For details click here.