Better
Ground

Replenishing Our Region

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34+
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Our new address is:

800 SW 39th St, Suite 150
Renton, WA  98057

At King Conservation District, we’re all about better ground. Better ground means taking important stewardship actions at home and in our communities to create healthy soil and water, to provide healthy food, and to conserve land, water, forests, wildlife and related natural resources. And you don’t have to go at it alone. You have a partner, your local conservation district.

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Healthy
Soil
KCD
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KCD Rate Renewal Public Hearings

Notice is hereby given that King Conservation District’s Board of Supervisors has scheduled public hearings for Monday, July 22, 2019, commencing at 6:00 p.m. in the Emerald City Room of the Lindbloom Student Union Building of Green River College located at 12401 S.E. 320th St., Auburn, WA 98092, and for Wednesday, July 24, 2019, commencing at 6:00 p.m. at the Phinney Center located at 6532 Phinney Ave N., Seattle, WA 98103 in order to gather information and to receive public comment on the proposed system of rates and charges and corresponding plan of work being considered for adoption by the Board of Supervisors. This proposal is pursuant to RCW 89.08.405 and RCW 89.08.400 to fund KCD’s conservation activities and programs. Information regarding the public hearing may be obtained from KCD’s website at www.kingcd.org/ratesandcharges.

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It starts
with you

1 day ago

King Conservation District

When hiking through the Grove of the Patriarchs, have you ever looked at a tree and thought, “I could make some great clothes out of that”?

Or maybe standing beside one of the great tree trunks laying on the ground and said, “that would make a great canoe to go traveling in”?

The western red-cedar, Thuja plicata, has provided clothes, transportation and much more to the people of the Pacific Northwest for thousands and thousands of years.

It’s pretty easy to spot a western red-cedar. The trunk is covered in fibrous, gray to red bark that runs in vertical strips up the trunk. In stead of long, skinny pine needles, it has pleated, overlapping scales. In fact, part of it’s name, plicata, means pleated. Just like a braid. Strongly rot resistant, it can grow for a thousand years. While growing quite tall, about 200 feet, it also grows horizontally, spreading out almost 19 feet wide.

With the many ways people have found to use this marvelous plant, it has been a valuable resource for hundreds and thousands of years. But standing in the presence of these great trees, like those in the Grove, maybe you can find something even more to treasure in a western red-cedar. Maybe just being in the presence of a living being over a thousand years old is priceless for you, all by itself. ~ams

NPS Photo of a branch of a western red-cedar tree close up to see the cones and scales. February, 2019. NPS/C. Roundtree Photo of the Grove of the Patriarch’s boardwalk leading up the wide trunk of a western red-cedar. NPS Photo looking up the trunk of a large western red-cedar with a bright sky background. October, 2016.
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Have questions about this and other trees? KCD staff will be at King County Fair all weekend. Our forestry team will be there specifically on our “Forest” day this Thursday. Pick up a free native tree (very limited supply!) from the KCD Gazebo as well.

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