Work Continues on the Heiser Farm

Newly planted stream buffer

Bryan and Susan Heiser, owners of Trinity Ranch in Enumclaw, specialize in boarding, retirement, recovery and rehabilitation for horses. The Heisers have worked with KCD to help conserve natural resources on their property since Jay Mirro worked with them to develop a Farm Conservation Plan in 2012. The Heisers have utilized conservation practices including manure bins, heavy use areas, sub-surface drainage, cross-fencing and a stream crossing. Much of this work was done with cost-share funding from KCD, King County, and Washington Conservation Commission. They have graciously hosted farm tours to showcase their projects. They’ve been recognized as a KCD Conservation Landowner of the Year and a KCD Farm of Merit.

This winter, KCD AmeriCorps Crews installed a 35-foot wide riparian forest buffer along the stream and the Heisers will install fencing to protect the buffer from grazing animals. The buffer consists of over 1000 native plants from 26 different species along 630 linear feet of shoreline to create a half-acre riparian forest. The crew used temporary black plastic to suppress weeds around the new plants until they are established. The forest will provide many ecosystem services including cleaning and cooling the water running to the creek, improving pasture health through both soil retention and reduced wind evaporation, and also providing food and habitat for wildlife including fish, birds and beneficial insects.

The Heisers are ensuring lasting impacts by protecting water, creating habitat, and building soil. These enhancements to natural resources will provide a healthy environment for them, their animals and their neighbors. We are grateful to continue working with the Heisers and value our ability to help land managers across King County to meet their conservation goals through education, guidance and funding.

If you would like to work with KCD to meet your land management goals, you can request assistance on our Contact page.

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