King Conservation District Bids Farewell to Board Chair & Welcomes Newest Member

KCD Former Board Chair Dick Ryon
KCD Former Board Chair Dick Ryon

After six years on the King Conservation District (KCD) Board of Supervisors, Chair Dick Ryon is stepping back into private life. “My experience with the Board and staff at KCD has been a pleasure,” said Dick. “I am proud of the work we’ve done these past six years and I am pleased to be leaving the organization in such capable and dedicated hands.”

Chair Ryon came to the Pacific NW as a Forester for Weyerhaeuser in 1978. He retired in 1996, and was appointed to the King County Rural Forest Commission in 2010. It was this role that brought him into the KCD-KC Task Force, a region-wide body convened in 2013 to explore KCD’s unique role in shepherding King County into an environmentally sustainable and resilient future.

Once the Task Force was completed, Ryon joined the KCD Advisory Committee tasked with helping the organization lay out a plan to deploy the vision outlined by the regional stakeholders. From there, he ran for and was elected to the Board of Supervisors in 2014 , re-elected in 2017, and elected by his Board peers to the role of Chair in 2016.

“I’m going to miss you guys,” said Ryon at a recent gathering. “But I’m proud of my role in helping position KCD to be an even bigger asset to this region.”

Stepping into the seat previously filled by Dick Ryon is recently-elected and newly-certified Board of Supervisors member Chris Porter. Supervisor Porter is a West Seattle resident elected in February by King County voters. Supervisor Porter has served as an Associate Supervisor since mid-2019 and has been active in KCD restoration events and a vocal advocate of the organization.

KCD Board Member Chris Porter
KCD Board Member Chris Porter

Porter is an avid cyclist, beekeeper, and dedicated conservationist. Porter brings with him a passion for raising the profile of conservation districts, good governance, and engaging a new generation of conservationists. “I want people to know they can volunteer on conservation projects throughout the county planting native plants, visiting local farms, and supporting orcas, salmon, and native pollinators,” says Porter. “I want everyone to know that they can change what happens to our environment.”

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